Physics@Home by Topic

Light & Optics

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Permanent Rainbow

Create a lasting rainbow with some nail polish


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Glowing Jell-O Physics

Fluorescent Jell-O is easy to make and fun to eat


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Create Your Own Rainbow

Learn about refraction in the kitchen


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Fluorescent Olive Oil

Discover fluorescence with a laser pointer and a few drops of olive oil


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Gravitational Wine Glass Lens

A simple home experiment can mimic the light-bending effects of dark matter


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Physics in a Glass: Reversing Arrows

It went that way…I mean that way? Which way does this arrow point? Using physics to give bad directions.


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Physics in Your Fish Tank: Swedish Fishing

Try this experiment if you want to spear some candy fish, if you can catch them.


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Physics on Your Christmas Tree: Lighting up with LEDs

In the season of lights, make your own glowing creations with LEDs.


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Physics at the Party: Dancing Lasers

Add some light to your night. Make your party one that your friends remember, let those lasers dance, using physics! Use this simple experiment to illustrate sound waves, vibration and reflection.


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Laser Jell-O

If you thought Jell-O only did funny things to your tummy then you need to see what it does to light! Come explore as light changes its path when it passes through Jell-O.


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Big O’ Glass of Sunset!

See why the sky is blue and a sunset is orange, all in a glass of milk!


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Physics in the Microwave: Microwave Soap

What did people do before microwaves? Imagine having to use the oven to heat up your leftover pizza or an air popper to make popcorn…and how else could you make these amazing soap sculptures?


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Physics in the Snow: Snowy Colors

Most people associate Ben Franklin with electricity, but his first recorded experiment was on something totally different – color and heat. You’ve probably noticed that you heat up faster in the sunlight if you’re wearing a dark shirt.


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Physics in the Living Room: Remote Control Tricks

Few things are as frustrating as searching through couch cushions for a lost remote just as your favorite reality show is starting. What would we do without remotes? In addition to being essential to our TV watching, they are a great way to explore light.